Axium SOP

Topic Progress:

INTERIOR ROOMS

7.01 Ceilings

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: Same as NACHI Standards of Practice.

Tools Needed

The inspector will need to use the flashlight to inspect ceilings where the lighting is not good (like closets/pantries). Also, if the inspector observes any staining from water they should use the moisture meter to check that spot.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • While the inspector is checking all of the interior rooms they should observe the ceilings for any damage. If there is an old repair or water stains that are present you should always put the moisture meter on that spot. Make sure to take pictures of the moisture meter in the location of the stain or repair.
  • The most important things to look for while observing the ceilings at the interior rooms is for signs of leaking and for any cracking.

Common Defects

  • The ceiling has an access hole, crack, seam crack, multiple cracks, or several hairline cracks.
  • The ceiling is damaged, deteriorated, loose, is missing a piece, or is missing in areas.
  • The ceiling has nail pops, signs of repair, or is warped/buckled.
  • The ceiling is peeling from water leak above.
  • The ceiling has peeled in areas and needs prep/paint.
  • The ceiling was peeling or loose.
  • The ceiling has a light stain or a water stain.
  • The ceiling revealed tape and nail beds in areas (cosmetic).
  • The ceiling showed pulling or wrinkling of the drywall tape at the corner, which could reflect structural movement in this area.
  • Evidence of possible mold-like substance was observed on ceiling.
  • Ceiling tiles that may contain asbestos.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking the entire ceiling for any damage.
  • Not using the moisture meter and taking a picture with it in the picture if there are signs of water staining or signs of repair.

7.02 Walls

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: Same as NACHI Standards of Practice.

Tools Needed

The inspector will need to use the flashlight to inspect walls where the lighting is not good (like closets/pantries). Also, if the inspector observes any staining from water they should use the moisture meter to check that spot.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • While the inspector is in the interior rooms they should observe the walls for any damage. If there is an old repair or water stains they should always use the moisture meter. Make sure to take pictures of the moisture meter in the location of the stain or repair. Also check for moisture if you see bubbled paint.
  • The most important things to look for while observing the walls at the interior rooms is for signs of leaking and for any cracking.

Common Defects

  • The walls have an access hole, bulge, crack, seam crack, hairline cracks, or multiple cracks.
  • The walls have damage, pet damage, framing damage, or is deteriorated.
  • The walls have missing or loose grout.
  • The walls are loose or missing in areas.
  • There are signs of moisture behind the walls and/or moisture stains on the walls.
  • Possible mold-like substance is present on the walls.
  • There are nail pops, peeling paint, or the wall is peeling/loose in areas.
  • There are signs of repair or mismatch in paint at the walls.
  • The wall is sloped, had tape pulling/wrinkling, or revealed tape and nail bed areas.
  • The walls were missing silicone caulking around control knob cover plate.
  • The walls were not finished properly (Missing caulk or paint).
  • There is evidence of wood-destroying insects present at the walls.
  • Evidence of possible mold-like substance is present on the walls.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking the entire walls for any damage.
  • Not using the moisture meter and taking a picture with it in the picture if there are signs of water staining or signs of repair.

7.03 Floors

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector should lift any carpets or rugs (if possible and not attached) in order to check for damage to the floor.

Tools Needed

If the inspector observes any staining from water, they should use the moisture meter to check that spot on the floor.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • While inspecting the interior rooms observe the flooring for any damage.
  • Move rugs when inspecting floors, looking for cracked or damaged tiles or grout, water damage on wood floors, damaged linoleum, or damaged carpet.
  • Search for any signs of previous water damage and note any bowing/cracking on wood flooring. Remember to lift carpets and check underneath rugs if possible.
  • Also run your hands along the perimeter of the floor.

Common Defects

  • The floor is blemished, cracked, damaged, deteriorated, or faded.
  • The carpet is loose or loose at the edge.
  • The grout on the flooring is damaged or missing.
  • The floor has a hump, is loose, or missing.
  • The floor needs shoe-mold, is not sealed at the edge, or is not sloped to drain.
  • The floor had pet damage, slopes, squeaks, or is stained.
  • The floor revealed a seam or had seams that were wide/inconsistent.
  • The floor had tiles that were cracked, damaged, or loose.
  • The floor had a transition piece that was missing, a trip hazard, or was warped/buckled.
  • The floor was missing mortar/sealer or was not installed according to current standards.
  • The floor felt weak (not supported), had wear/tear, or had wet stains.
  • The floor revealed damage from WDI (Wood Destroying Insects).
  • The floor had tiles that may contain asbestos.

Common Mistakes

  • Not running your hand along any wood flooring to feel for damage.
  • Not checking all of the flooring in the interior rooms for damage.
  • Not lifting rugs, carpets, or mats that could be covering up damage.

7.04 Doors

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector should check every accessible door at the property.

Tools Needed

No tools required to inspect the interior doors.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • Inspector should test every interior door by opening and closing it. Should check to make sure that it operates smoothly and is able to lock properly if there is a lock that is present.
  • Always check doors from the outside, not the inside, in case the knob is broken and you don’t want to lock yourself in a room. We are looking to make sure the door is square, aligned properly, latch closes, any damage on the front and don’t forget to look at the back of the door.

Common Defects

  • Door is very difficult to slide on the track or did not operate smoothly.
  • The door is damaged from a break in, pet, or has poor repairs.
  • The dead bolt needs adjustment or is missing.
  • The ball catch on the door needs adjustment or is missing.
  • The door is damaged, defective, delaminated, installed improperly, missing, or does not latch securely.
  • The door does not shut, is not square, is off track, peeling paint, or has been removed.
  • The door rubs at the bottom, floor, jamb, or top when opening and closing.
  • The door swings open/closed, swings over the step, or is weathered.
  • The door stop is damaged or missing.
  • The floor guides are missing or not operating.
  • There is a gap around the door.
  • The door handle is damaged, difficult to turn, loose, or missing.
  • The door hardware is not recessed.
  • The hinge is loose, missing, or missing screws.
  • The door jamb is deteriorated.
  • The door knob is loose, missing, or in need of repair/replacement.
  • The mirror on the door is cracked or broken.
  • The door is missing the handle or some other hardware.
  • The door needed nail heads set, putty, prep and paint or seal.
  • The shower doors swing, have a missing handle, or is not latching.
  • The slide latch is difficult to operate.
  • The strike-plate is missing, not latching, or is not tight.
  • The door was not inspected with a key.
  • Weather stripping is missing, damaged, or revealed daylight.
  • Window on the door is broken, cracked, or has a damaged seal.
  • The door would not close properly.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking every door in the property and making sure all the components on the door are in good condition.

7.05 Windows

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector shall inspect all accessible doors and windows by visual inspection and by opening and closing them.

Tools Needed

No tools required to inspect the interior windows.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • Inspect window frame, casing and sill for damage.
  • Look for signs of moisture intrusion around and under window.
  • If signs of previous leaks test area with moisture meter.
  • Inspect glass for damage, cracks, and evidence of broken seals.
  • Inspect lock and crank mechanisms by locking and unlocking and cranking handles.
  • Make note of missing cranks or other hardware.
  • Open and close window indicating smooth operation, checking spring rails and sash cords.
  • Make sure the window stays in the upright position without assistance.
  • If double sash window – open and close the top sash and verify proper operation.
  • Inspect window tilt mechanisms looking for damage plastic latches.
  • Inspect screens for damage or bent frames, or missing.
  • Inspect for proper egress windows (see full section below).

Common Defects

  • Sash Cords (Severed, Missing, Damaged)
  • Crank Handle (Not Working, Loose, Missing, Damaged)
  • Window Frame (Damaged, Loose, Peeling Paint, Moisture Damage)
  • Window Did Not Close Completely
  • Glass (Broken, Cracked, Missing, Loose at Frame)
  • Glass Not Tempered
  • Glazing Missing
  • Grille (Damaged)
  • Lock (Loose, Not Operating properly, Damaged, Missing)
  • NI – AC Unit in Window
  • Sash (Difficult to Operate, Not Aligned, Rubs or Scrapes, Stuck, Top Slides Down)
  • Screens (Missing, Damaged)
  • Window Thermal Seals (Damaged, Cloudy)
  • Sill, Casing, Frame (Damaged)
  • Spring Rails (Loose, Weak, Missing)
  • Missing Cranks
  • Locks Not Working

Common Mistakes

  • Damaging Blinds – Be very careful when opening and closing blinds. The blind cords can get brittle from being exposed to the sun. Support the blinds with one hand while pulling the cords and opening so all of the weight is not on the pull cords.
  • Returning Blinds to their original position – observe the exact position the blinds are in and return the blinds to the open or closed position as found.
  • Forcing windows open and breaking glass pane – Do not force a window open if it is stuck. Carefully try to open by applying pressure evenly to the top and bottom.
  • Missing Broken Seals – Look at the window from different angles while opening and closing and as you walk up to the window. Observe windows from exterior and interior looking for evidence of broken seals and foggy windows. If the windows are dirty then clean a small area with your towel to distinguish between dirt and condensation between the panes.
  • Not Inspecting Every Accessible Window – The one window you do not inspect is the one window that will have an expensive defect.

EGRESS

IBC Code 2015 information about proper window dimensions for egress:

1030.1 Sleeping rooms below the 4th story, above grade plane, shall have at least one exterior emergency escape and rescue opening.

1030.2 Emergency escape and rescue openings shall have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet. Net clear opening refers to the actual free and clear space that exists when the window is open. It is not the rough opening size or the glass panel size or any other size, but the actual opening a person can crawl through. Code officials want the opening large enough so firefighters can comfortably crawl through the window in full protective gear with an air tank on their back.

Ground-floor windows only need a net clear opening of 5 sq. ft.; they can be smaller because a rescue ladder doesn’t take up part of the opening.

1030.2.1 The minimum net clear opening height dimension shall be 24 inches. The minimum net clear opening width dimension shall be 20 inches.

(A window opening that’s the bare minimum of 24 in. high and 20 in. wide does not meet egress requirements, since its net clear opening is only 3.33 sq. ft. A window has to be taller and/or wider than these minimums to meet the 5.7-sq.-ft.-opening requirement.)

1030.3 The bottom of the clear opening should not be greater than 44 inches measured from the floor.

1030.4 The opening shall be operational from the inside of the room without the use of keys or tools.

7.06 Electrical Outlets

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector should check every accessible electrical outlet throughout the property.

Tools Needed

The inspector will use the GFCI receptacle tester to check all of the electrical outlets at the property. We do not hit the tester button when checking regular outlets throughout the interior rooms.

Pictures Needed

Tester in outlet

Procedure

  • While inspecting the interior rooms you should check every accessible electrical outlet in the home with the GFCI receptacle tester. You will also want to check the outlets for any general damage to make sure they are in good condition.
  • Under new construction it is required to have an outlet every six feet in a room.
  • If all of the outlets in the home are working and there is no damage there is only one picture required for this section, which is just a picture of the tester in an outlet.
  • If there are any defects on outlets, make sure to point at the lights on the tester to indicate the outlet defect.

Common Defects

  • Damaged or missing faceplate.
  • Electrical outlets are installed at varying heights or was loose in the wall/no longer holds a plug securely.
  • Electrical outlet was damaged or broken.
  • Open Neutral – Reverse Polarity – Obstructed – Not Working – Not Grounded – Obstructed – Wired to Light.
  • The entire property was not grounded.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking every accessible outlet.
  • Not checking the outlets for visual damage and that they are secured in the wall.
  • Not carrying a backup outlet tester just in case your main tester breaks.

7.07 Electrical Fixtures and Switches

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector will check every lighting fixture in the home as well as all of the ceiling fans for proper operation.

Tools Needed

No tools required to inspect the Electrical Fixtures and Switches.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • While inspecting the interior rooms you will want to turn on and check every accessible light. If there are ceiling fans present at the property you will also want to turn those on to check for proper operation. There are no pictures required for this section, but if ceiling fans are present you will want to take a picture of each fan during operation to show that it was working at the time of the inspection.

Common Defects

  • Light fixture uses a light socket adapter and should have own outlet
  • Light bulb is missing or not working.
  • Can’t find the switch to turn on the light fixture.
  • The chain at the light fixture is missing or stuck.
  • The cord is hanging by electrical wiring.
  • The light cover is cracked or damaged.
  • The light fixture is damaged, exposed, flickered, loose, missing, has broken glass, or uses an extension cord.
  • There is a missing cover, missing, glass, missing globe, or missing a part.
  • The light fixture is not working or old/rusty.
  • The closet light has an exposed light bulb or does not have proper clearance from storage area.
  • The ceiling fan has a chain that is broken, missing, or only controlled by the chain.
  • The ceiling fan has a loose cover or missing cover.
  • The ceiling fan light was not working.
  • The ceiling fan glass is broken or missing.
  • The ceiling fan has a missing globe, part, or remote.
  • The ceiling fan mounting is not proper or might not be proper.
  • The ceiling fan is not working or has a dead remote.
  • The ceiling fan is noisy or rubbing.
  • The ceiling fan is too low, had exposed wires, or wobbles.
  • The light switch was wired wrong, buzzes, is damaged, defective, loose, or missing.
  • The light switch is missing a cover plate, knob, or screw.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking every light fixture in the property.
  • Not checking every ceiling fan in the property and taking a picture during operation.

7.08 Steps, Stairways, Balconies and Railings

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: Same as NACHI Standards of Practice.

Tools Needed

The inspector will need to use a tape measure in order to check the distance between the spindles on any railings or the height of the risers.

Pictures Needed

Picture if defect only

Procedure

  • While inspecting the interior of the property the inspector should observe the steps and handrails. We want to make sure to push against the handrail to test that it is secure and measure the spindles with our tape measure. Also, we would want to inspect under the staircase for any defect that might be hidden. There are no pictures for this section unless a defect is found.

Common Defects

  • The steps are damaged, loose, sloped, have high risers, or a tread that is too short.
  • There is not sufficient headroom at the interior steps.
  • There is loose carpet/tile at the interior stairs.
  • The steps were not installed in a satisfactory and safe manner.
  • The guard/handrail is loose, missing, lower than 32”, or had no return at railing ends.
  • The spindles at the guard/handrail were greater than 4”.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking all of the handrails or calling out when a handrail is missing.
  • Not measuring the spacing of the spindles.

7.09 Smoke Detectors

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector will test every accessible smoke alarm by using the test button.

Tools Needed

No tools required to inspect the smoke alarms.

Pictures Needed

Picture of detector

Procedure

  • While inspecting the interior rooms the inspector should locate and test all of the smoke detectors throughout the property. If they are all operational you would just take one picture for this section of a smoke detector.

Common Defects

  • Smoke detectors not being installed in the proper locations and are needing to be installed.
  • The smoke detector beeps, is disconnected, loose, missing a battery, missing a cover, are not working, or needs to be relocated.

Common Mistakes

  • Not testing all of the smoke detectors throughout the property.

7.10 Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector will test every accessible carbon-monoxide detector by using the test button. We also want to make sure that these are within 15 feet of every sleeping room.

Tools Needed

No tools required to inspect the carbon monoxide detectors.

Pictures Needed

Picture of detector

Procedure

  • While inspecting the interior rooms the inspector should locate and test all of the carbon monoxide detectors throughout the property. If they are all operational you would just take one picture for this section of a carbon monoxide detector. It is important to look for these within 15 feet of every sleeping room.

Common Defects

  • There are no carbon monoxide detectors present at the property.
  • The carbon monoxide did not operate when tested, was damaged, or not secured properly.
  • The carbon monoxide detector was installed greater than 15 feet from sleeping areas.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking all of the carbon monoxide detectors and making sure they are within 15 feet of every sleeping room in the property.
  • Missing a carbon monoxide detector because it is a combination with a smoke detector.

7.11 Presence of Installed Heat Source

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: While the heat is turned on at the property the inspector will check all operable heat sources in the interior rooms.

Tools Needed

The infrared thermometer will be used to test that heat is coming out from the supply register

Pictures Needed

Heat gun with the temperature

Procedure

  • Once the heat is turned on in the property (exact procedure will be under the heating system section) the inspector will check all accessible heat sources in the interior rooms. This should be one of the last things that you perform during the home inspection.
  • You will use your infrared thermometer to check if heat is coming through the supply registers. We want the picture to show us pointing the infrared thermometer at the supply register showing a temperature over 100 degrees. We want to get these heat sources for every register that is accessible in the home, not just a couple.
  • If there is no heat source present you will take a picture with the infrared thermometer turned sideways. This would be a defect if no heat source is in a room to be considered a living space.

Common Defects

  • Supply register or return air cover is damaged, broken, loose, missing, noisy, old, or weak.
  • There is no heat coming to the supply register.
  • Baseboard heater is damaged, broken, loose, missing, noisy, old, weak, or has no heat coming from it.
  • Supply register is not intended for the floor.
  • The louver on the supply register is stuck or damaged.
  • There is no cover for the supply register, baseboard heater, or return air vent.
  • Having a heat source that is not present in an interior room.

Common Mistakes

  • Not checking all of the supply registers in the interior rooms when the heat is on at the property.
  • Only checking the registers for heat and not checking for any damage.
  • Not checking return air covers for any damage.