Inspection Training

How to Inspect the Plumbing Water Pressure (UPDATED 9/7/17)

While the inspector is at the exterior of the home they will want to check the plumbing water pressure at an exterior faucet. If the water pressure is within 40-80 PSI it is considered to be in an acceptable range. If it is lower than 40 or higher than 80 it should be called out as a defect. Please review the entire procedure below.

NACHI SOP

International Standards of Practice for Performing a General Home Inspection

 

3.6. Plumbing

I. The inspector shall inspect:

N/A

 

II. The inspector shall describe:

N/A

 

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

N/A

 

IV. The inspector is not required to:

D. Determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply.

 

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: The inspector will check the plumbing water pressure at the property if there is an accessible faucet with a threaded end.

 

Tools Needed

The inspector will use the water pressure gauge on an exterior faucet or laundry faucet (if accessible) to determine the water pressure of the property.

 

Procedure

  • First the inspector will have to find a faucet that has a threaded end, most likely while inspecting the exterior of the property.
  • When checking the exterior faucet switch over to the plumbing section and take a picture of the water pressure on the gauge (between 40 to 80 PSI is acceptable).
  • After the picture is taken turn the water off and take the water pressure gauge off the exterior faucet. Make sure to re-attach a hose if it needed to be removed to perform this test.
  • If there is no exterior faucet that can be used to test the water pressure the inspector could use a laundry faucet if the hoses are not connected. DO NOT remove laundry hoses to check the water pressure.
  • If water pressure is too high or low, you need to check and see if a pressure regulating valve is installed above the main water shut off to the home. Usually on wall towards front of house.
  • If the property that you are inspecting has a well it is okay if the water pressure is between 30-50 PSI and would NOT be a defect.
Common Defects

  • Low Pressure
  • High Pressure

 

Common Mistakes

  • Not getting a clear picture showing the water pressure of the property.
  • If the water pressure for a well is between 30-50 PSI that is considered okay and would NOT be a defect.

 

Report / Software

IN


  • Within Limits: The property water supply pressure was [word 1], as measured at the exterior hose bib. Property water supply pressure was within the acceptable limits of 40 pounds per square inch (PSI) and 80 PSI at the time of the inspection

NI

  • A water pressure gauge requires a plumbing fixture with a threaded end, such as an exterior faucet.
  • Water Not On: The water was not on for the inspection. The inspector could not inspect condition of faucets, fixtures, plumbing, pressure or volume. Once water is restored to the property a qualified contractor should fully evaluate the plumbing system and repair or replace all areas as necessary.
  • Exterior Faucets Off: The water had been turned off at the exterior faucets at the time of the inspection. The condition of the faucets and the water pressure for the property could not be evaluated.

NP

  • N/A

RR

  • Low Pressure: The property water supply pressure was [word 1], as measured at the exterior hose bib. Property water supply pressure was lower than the 40 pounds per square inch (PSI) considered adequate by generally accepted current standards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary and according to current standards.
  • High Pressure: The property water supply pressure was [word 1], as measured at the exterior hose bib. Property water supply pressure exceeded the 80 pounds per square inch (PSI) limit considered the maximum allowable by generally accepted current standards. Excessively high water pressure is likely to cause leaks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary and according to current standards.