Inspection Training

How to Inspect the AC Cooling System Description

While the inspector is inspecting the cooling system they will need to determine what type of system is present at the property. Please review the entire procedure below.

NACHI SOP

International Standards of Practice for Performing a General Home Inspection

 

3.5. Cooling

 

I. The inspector shall inspect:

A. The cooling system, using normal operating controls.

 

II. The inspector shall describe:
B. The cooling method.

 

III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:

B. If the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.

 

IV. The inspector is not required to:

A. Determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system.

B. Inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters.

C. Operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65° Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment.

D. Inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks.

E. Examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.

 

Axium SOP Differences

Axium Requires: Same as NACHI Standards of Practice

 

Tools Needed

No tools required to inspect the AC Cooling System Description.

 

Procedure

  • When you first get to the air conditioner you will want to place your short level and the small digital thermometer on top of the air compressor cabinet. We will use these tools in the later sections, not in this section. The digital thermometer will only be used if the temperature is less than 65 degrees and we want to show why we didn’t inspect the operation of the unit. There is no picture required for this section because all that we are doing is describing the type of air conditioning system.

 

Common Defects

  • No defects for this section. If there is an evaporative cooler present we would just exclude the entire section and choose the “Not Inspected” tab.

 

Common Mistakes

  • Not describing the right type of air conditioning system.

 

Report / Software

IN

  • Split System: The air conditioning system was a split system in which the cabinet housing the compressor, cooling fan, and condensing coils was located physically apart from the evaporative coils. As is typical with split systems, the compressor/condenser cabinet was located at the property’s exterior so that the heat collected inside the property could be released to the outside air. Evaporator coils designed to collect heat from the property interior were located inside a duct at the furnace.
  • 2 Split System: The property had two air conditioning systems. The air conditioning systems were split systems in which the cabinet housing the compressor, cooling fan, and condensing coils was located physically apart from the evaporative coils. As is typical with split systems, the compressor/condenser cabinet was located at the property’s exterior so that the heat collected inside the property could be released to the outside air. Evaporator coils designed to collect heat from the property interior were located inside a duct at the furnace.
  • Package System: The property had a package air conditioning system which was mounted on the roof. Package systems are those in which all components of the cooling system are installed within one cabinet.

NI

  • Evaporative Cooler: The property had a single-stage evaporative cooler (also called a “swamp cooler”) mounted. Evaporative coolers are not within the scope of the property inspection and the unit was not inspected. In low-humidity areas, evaporating water into the air provides a natural and energy- efficient means of cooling. Evaporative coolers, also called swamp coolers, rely on this principal, cooling outdoor air by passing it over water-saturated pads, causing the water to evaporate into it. The 15°- 40°F-cooler air is then directed into the property, and pushes warmer air out through the windows. When operating an evaporative cooler, windows are opened part way to allow warm indoor air to escape as it is replaced by cooled air. Unlike central air conditioning systems that recirculate the same air, evaporative coolers provide a steady stream of fresh air into the house. Evaporative coolers cost about half as much to install as central air conditioners and use about one-quarter as much energy. However, they require more frequent maintenance than conventional air-conditioners and they’re more suitable for areas with low humidity. They require annual maintenance and require a specialist inspection. The Inspector recommends inspection of the evaporative cooler by a qualified contractor. Here are some of the items which should be checked at the beginning of each cooling season: Blower assembly and motor bearings need lubrication. Fan belts should have the proper tension. Belt movement should be approximately 1 inch maximum. The water level should be a little below the top of the tray, with the top of the overflow pipe sticking out of the water. If the water is not at the proper level the float arm may need adjustment. The water tray should be free of debris. Cooler pads should be in good condition. Water lines should be disconnected and blown free for the winter in cold climates.


NP

  • This property did not have a central air conditioning system installed.

RR

  • N/A


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